Last edited by Samum
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

5 edition of equestrian officers of the Roman Imperial Army found in the catalog.

equestrian officers of the Roman Imperial Army

by H. Devijver

  • 61 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Gieben in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Equestrian order (Rome),
  • Rome -- History, Military,
  • Rome -- Army -- Officers

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby H. Devijver.
    SeriesMavors Roman Army researches -- v. 6,9, Mavors Roman Army researches -- v. 9
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDG83.3 .D48 1989
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. :$bill.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19641903M
    ISBN 109050630073, 3515061797

      The Imperial Roman Army. Introduction This is my topic on the Imperial Roman this topic I will be talking about the Legions, the organisation of the legions, the weaponry, the Officers, the Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs), and other special units such as the auxiliary troops, The Praetorian Guard, The Imperial Guard, and the Imperial horse guard. Ancient Rome - Ancient Rome - The Roman Senate and the urban magistracies: Augustus regarded the Senate, whose leading member (princeps senatus) he had become in 28, as a body with important functions; it heard fewer overseas embassies than formerly, but otherwise its dignity and authority seemed unimpaired; its members filled the highest offices; its decrees, although not formally called .

    The Equestrian Officers of the Roman Imperial Army II (= Mavors 9), – 50 For an earlier view see Campbell, op. cit. (n. 39), 50f., stressing the fellow-soldier theme. Recommend this journalCited by: 3. Up until , as the historian Istvan Deak points out in his book, Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps -- , no other army in the world produced more Jewish officers than the Austrian-Hungarian n and , the Prussian Army trained more than Jewish officer candidates, but not a single candidate received a commission.

    The commander of each fleet was a prefect from the equestrian order, like the prefects who commanded the auxiliaries. The fleets were originally staffed with army officers. For a time under Claudius, the job was part of a civil career with some men having no real military experience. The Roman Imperial Army of the First and Second Centuries.   The wikipedia article cited elsewhere in this thread gives an OK but extremely incomplete listing. You could easily fill a book of hundreds of pages describing only the rank structure of the Roman army. As an example there are at least 84 known ra.


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Equestrian officers of the Roman Imperial Army by H. Devijver Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Equestrian Officers of the Roman Imperial Army (Mavors Roman Army Research, Vol 6) [Devijner, H.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Equestrian Officers of the Roman Imperial Army (Mavors Roman Army Research, Vol 6).

The Equestrian Officers and their Monuments is an original contribution for this volume. Enhanced by the indices, this book helps us understand the social class and military role of Rome's equestrian by: 5.

The Equestrian Officers and their Monuments is an original contribution for this volume. Enhanced by the indices, this book helps us understand the social class and military role of Rome's equestrian officers.

(source: Nielsen Book Data). Additional Physical Format: Online version: Devijver, H. Equestrian officers of the Roman Imperial Army. Amsterdam: J.C. Gieben, (OCoLC) The Roman Imperial Army of the First and Second Centuries A.D.

Third Edition by Also the organization of the units, officers, immunes (and the list of professions that applied for the immune status), training, equipment, dona militaria, standards and musical instruments. There is a decent subchapter on the roman navy detailing deployment Cited by: Cambridge Core - Ancient History - A History of the Roman Equestrian Order - by Caillan Davenport.

Books; A History of the Roman Equestrian Order; A History of the Roman Equestrian Order. A History of the Roman Equestrian Order. Get access. Buy the print book Check if you have access via personal or institutional login.

Now available in paperback, The Imperial Roman Army looks at the structure and development of the army between the Republic and the Late Empire, examining why the army has always been accorded such a prominent position in the history of the Roman Empire, and whether that view is justified.

The book is divided into three sections. The author first examines the major divisions of army 5/5(1). "Mavors. Roman Army Researches" published on 01 Jan by Brill.

Equestrians were also the chief financial officers (also called procuratores Augusti) of the imperial provinces, and the deputy financial officers of senatorial provinces.

At Rome, equestrians filled numerous senior administrative posts such as the emperor's secretaries of state (from the time of Claudius e.g.

correspondence and treasury) and the praefecti annonae (director of grain supplies). Between junior officers (principales) and senior officers (tribuni militum), the Roman army contained a class of officers called centurions (centuriones, singular form: centurio, literally "commanders of men") in the infantry and decurions (decuriones, singular form decurio, literallyDisbanded: Became the late Roman army.

This book is the first to examine in detail not just the early imperial army but also the citizens' militia of the Republic and the army of the later Empire. The unprecedented scope and longevity of Roman military success is placed in the context of ordinary soldiers' daily lives, whether spent in the quiet routine of a peaceful garrison or in.

This classic work of scholarship scrutinizes all aspects of Roman military forces throughout the Roman Empire, in Europe, North Africa, and the Near and Middle East. Graham Webster describes the Roman army’s composition, frontier systems, camps and forts, activities in the field (including battle tactics, signaling, and medical services), and peacetime duties, as well as the army’s overall 5/5(2).

After serving in the army as an officer, a potential equestrian might become a procurator – an agent of the emperor. He could then become a prefect, or government administrator, at home or abroad. Devijver, Hubert, The Equestrian Officers of the Roman Army 2 vols.

(Amsterdam). Dubuisson, Michel, "Renseignements, espionnagae et services secrets dans l' armée romaine," Ktéma 21 () Egger, R., Das Praetorium als Amtssitz.

The Junior Officers of the Roman Army in the Republican Period. A Study on Social Structure Roman Officers Jaakko Suolahti: The Junior Officers of the Roman Army in the Republican Period. (Annales Academiae Scientiarum Fennicae, Ser. B, Tom. ) The Equestrian Officers of the Roman Imperial Army.

Patricia Southern gives a lot of details as well as a general historical overview of the Roman army in this book.

As a result, she satisfies the appetites of Roman history buffs wanting a scholarly breakdown of the republican-turned-imperial army and those simply wanting a broader understanding of the army's evolution/5.

The Imperial Roman Army had to maintain order in a vast area with various different challenges and enemies. To adapt to these challenges a diverse force was needed, ranging from elite troops on the fringes of the Empire to firefighters within the walls of Rome.

This companion provides an extensive account of the Roman army, exploring its role in Roman politics and society as well as the reasons for its effectiveness as a fighting force.

An extensive account of the Roman army, from its beginnings to its transformation in the later Roman Empire Examines the army as a military machine – its recruitment, training, organization, tactics and weaponry 5/5(1). Imperial Army of the Holy Roman Empire.

The Army of the Holy Roman Empire (German Reichsarmee, Reichsheer or Reichsarmatur; Latin exercitus imperii) was the army of the Holy Roman d init came to an end even before the Empire was wound up inas the result of the Napoleonic Wars. Books shelved as roman-army: Catiline's War, The Jugurthine War, Histories by Sallust, The History of Rome, Books The Early History of Rome by Livy.

MAVORS the indispensable series of compilations of papers by various renowned Roman army scholars. Volume I: Speidel, M.P.: Roman Army Studies .In the imperial army they only survived either as a unit of the troops of the city of Rome, in which case they were commanded by the praetorian prefects, or as individual functionaries (there may have been two or three of them) assisting equestrian auxiliary commanders, that is, commanders of smaller units in the Roman army.Soldiers of the Roman army --Living and working in the Roman army.

Part 1, With the legion --Roman artillery --Emperor's guards --Living and working in the Roman army. Part 2, The auxiliaries --Officers and men of the legion --Off duty --Roman army religion and customs --Army in war --Changes in army.